Reader’s Guide to Schleiermacher’s The Christian Faith

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I began reading Schleiermacher’s The Christian Faith this evening. I’ve gotten through Chapter I of the introduction, and I am pleasantly surprised with his elegant and succinct style . Anyway, for those following along with us, I’m attaching an excellent resource. It includes short summaries of each section of The Christian Faith. Also, I’ve added a new page for the reading weekly reading schedule.

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4 Responses to “Reader’s Guide to Schleiermacher’s The Christian Faith”

  1. John Anngeister Says:

    Thanks Jeremy – I’ll reset my Readings link to this page.

    I had expectations when I saw Schleiermacher’s title to Chap I.I, “.. Propositions Borrowed from Ethics” that I would find more Kant than I did – although there’s some, and I know he was deep into Kant in the 1790s.

    By the same token I expected to see the shadow of Hegel in I.II., “.. Propositions Borrowed from Philosophy of Religion” although I’m not well-enough read in Hegel to recognize it with the same ease as I can the Kant. Your thoughts?

    Of course there’s alot of originality in the writing too (i.e. pure Schleiermacher).

    I get a sense that one of his objectives may be to say more than Kant was able to commit himself to regarding the transcendental ground without which religion is impossible or mere fantasy. More on that later, if it plays out.

  2. Jeremy Says:

    Agreed. I had similar expectations. His commentary on Islam and Judaism was frustrating. I also find it fascinating that he completely ignores the Trinity when discussing the history of religions, in hopes of proclaiming Christianity as the purest and highest of the religious faiths. But we’ll wait to have more of this discussion until Wesley’s makes the first post on the 17th.

    • A.J. Smith Says:

      Ya, his teleology of religions is weird. His ordering, with pure monotheism at its best, seems to totally ignore the trinity.

  3. Jeremy Says:

    This move also allows him to avoid the criticisms that some Jews or Muslims make of Christianity, namely, that, it is corrupted monotheism.

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